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. >> brown: we have two stories about continuing unrest in the middle east, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: large parts of new jersey were in ruins today, as it became clear the state bore the brunt of the storm from its coastline to the new york suburbs. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on rescue and recovery efforts in the northeast. plus, hari sreenivasan reports from lower manhattan where shuttered businesses are facing mounting losses. >> brown: then, after a pause from the storm. it was game back-on for the presidential candidates with five days to go before election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challengin
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding fo
: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for us all night. jeff, here's your first pass. >> brown: thank you, and with me is christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothen berg report to help sort through the senate races. let's start with florida, christina. >> none of the races that gwen and judy just mentioned called by the associated press were a big surprise but florida was an opportunity for the republicans. they thought this could end up being close. for a long time, senator nelson has been able to maintain his advantage there, even as the president and mitt romney are basically tied, in part pause he's as you been able to win the conservative democrats in the panhandle area of florida. but also this is just a state that has been so focused on for the presidential race, it hasn't gotten as much attention. >> brown: does it tell us much about the presidential race? >> i don't think so. if you talk to republicanned inners about connie mack's campaign, you get a load of criticism. he didn't raise money. he entered the race late. he didn't put togeth
examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >>
get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations
in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a heal
been financing this paycheck deduction measure and financing the anti-jerry brown tax measure, though he apparently didn't think he was. that's another story. and yet tom, the hedge fund manager, financing prop 39, i think that's the only one that looks safe at this point. and up got to wonder, i mean, what is it they want? do they see a civic duty, do they see a political future for them? tom, they wonder what he's going to do. but jerry brown is a guy who has been vexed by the munger family. in this race. right? molly munger's prop 38 could be drawing support away from him and her brother charlie munger is financing the campaign apparently to kill his tax measure. >> belva: did one of them put more money in this week? >> the brother, charles, into this political action committee called the small business action committee. i'm not sure there are any small businesses involved in it. that's been fueling this no on 30, yes on 32 mix. this is a tremendous amount of money. and i don't think any of us who watch california politics, the folks there in the studio or me, are surprised this is
representatives tom price and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possi
thanksgiving dinner. we examine how black friday has morphed into gray thursday. jeffrey brown has another thanksgiving day story about a turn of the century photographer who documented the lives of native americans. >> he ended up being the largest traffic odyssey in american history. he ended up doing 2,200 pages of text telling life stories, diets habits, sex lives. it's documentaries of lives and nations and people and one man did it all. >> sreenivasan: and we close with an encore look at a story about china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> sreenivasan: it was a day of calm in the middle east, after eight days of punishing israeli air strikes and hamas rocket fire. each side claimed the ceasefire was a victory, but neither was certain the truce would
. the architect of the law that says if you are white, you are all right. if you are brown, show me your papers. that resonated throughout the country. back in february, with that endorsement. it was great for the republican primary. for the general election -- there was a reaction from hispanics. and even marco rubio cannot correct the problem. they have a deeper problem. they have to deal with the george wallaces of the republican party. >> charles? >> and the demographics, the idea of republicans being white, i think, is wrong. it is true they have problems with african-americans, single women, and young people. those tend to be liberal. with hispanics that are naturally more conservative, religious, a catholic, it requires a change in policy on immigration. it can be done in one stroke. once it is done, we will not be speaking about the demographic issue. we will be talking about ideological issues. >> all right. let's talk about the new congress. >> i would not have been able to do this without your unbelievable support. you, my friends, stood with me when others tried to buy this election
ending eight days of deadly conflict. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour.
. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was mad
even as house speaker john boehner declares the negotiations are "going nowhere." >> brown: then, we turn to another congressional battle. kwame holman reports on sparring in the senate over proposals to change rules blamed for partisan gridlock. >> majority democrats want to put limits on the phil buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>
electorate. here in california, big win for governor jerry brown and his proposition 30, brings relief to scho schools. >> californians made the courageous decision to protect our schools and colleges and strengthen the california dream. bl >> belva: and a win-win for california democrats with an apparent two-thirds super majority in the legislature and the ability to raise taxes without votes from republicans. >> i promise that we will exercise this new power with strength but also with humility and with reason. >> belva: also, author maya angelou shares her story and warm words of wisdom about the meaning of friendship. >> it keeps you alive. it keeps you awake. it keeps you trying to be the best. >> belva: coming up next. . >>> hello, i'm belva davis, and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on this special night, my last, as host here are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle". lisa vor der brugen, "bay area news group." paul rogers, environment writer for "san jose mercury news." and carla marinucci, "san francisco chronicle," senior political reporter. carla,
. >> kaine. that is 8 for kaine. [laughter] >> massachusetts -- elizabeth warren or scott brown? >> warren. >> i think. >> sherrod brown, casey in pennsylvania. >> any upsets? >> the one that could be is kerrey in nebraska, which nobody would have predicted. capt.gotten -- >> medal of honor winner. >> is endorsement of the chuck hagel and alan simpson, serious republican leaders during the day and the senate. >> close in the poll. connecticut -- linda mcmahon's second race, millions of dollars doesn't do it. joe donnelly in indiana and not against mourdock -- hanging on against mourdock, the tea party candidate. jon tester in an absolute dead heat -- >> heidekamp, the long shot parcourse in north dakota, a perfect candidate, basically even with the republic -- terrific candidate, basically even with the republican candidate. mccaskill is close, i think. >> to use t -- do you see much ticket splitting? a vote for obama or romney and then republican or democrat? >> i think we are in more plus n -- allies nation. >> ticket splitting would be helpful to romney, if the democrats held the senate
brown. and it was introduced into this country about 1844, '45. so we can date this pitcher in that particular period. now, the shape itself began, as i said, in jersey city. it was carried by a modeler by the name of daniel greatbatch to bennington, vermont, where they did the same form of pitcher. and then it went to where this pitcher was made. it was made in cincinnati, ohio. this is cincinnati in the 1840s. now, the mark on it is an eagle. now, the eagle has been filled in with brown glaze, so you can't really read what's underneath that eagle. but it says "bromley, cincinnati". oh, my goodness. and the value of this is between, i would say, $2,000 to $3,000, probably around $2,800 realistically, something like that. what do you think of that? fabulous. (both laughing) did i tell you too much about it? no! (both laugh) woman: it's been in my family since about 1919. my father asked the buster brown company if they would send him a sign. it used to have prices of the shoes on it. male appraiser: little placards, right. but he knew that with the arms outstretched like thi
examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions
, tennessee, plant, where it plans to increase production of the passat. v.w.'s browning thinks industry- wide sales could hit 15 million units here next year, if the u.s. quickly solves its budget problems. >> clearly, there's a lot of issues in terms of the fiscal cliff to be addressed, and we don't expect them to be impacting consumer confidence too heavily. but the longer those debates go on, the more uncertainty there is in the market. >> reporter: browning thinks with products like the beetle convertible, volkswagen can continue to gain traction with u.s. consumers. diane eastabrook, nbr, chicago. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, our friday "market monitor" guest says, cliff or no cliff, next year will be bullish for stocks and the economy. haverford investments' hank smith will join us. finally, kfc at 35,000 feet. starting saturday, kfc meals will be available on some japan airlines flights. it's being billed as "air kentucky fried chicken." travelers will get a two-piece chicken meal with flatbread and coleslaw. why kfc and not sushi? the fast food chain is very popular in japan, especially d
, many want to be just like her. dr. gordon brown is hearing about the ambitions people have, many girls never see the inside of the classroom. she risked her life to campaign for girls' education and the united nations is going to carry on that fight. she pledged to campaign for them just before she was shot. >> simply for going to school, wanting to go to school, it is so unspeakable. >> they raise their voices in her honor, a nobel peace prize. the courageous teenager would be a worthy recipient. for more of the global attention her case has drawn, i spoke to the founder of women for women international that joined us from new york. the effect taking place in pakistan, is it possible something positive could come out of her plight? >> i would hope so. she is a representation of the plight of many girls. not only pakistan, but all over the world. a girl is very articulate, clear about what she wants, and within the frame of her culture and religion, is still targeted for assassination for speaking up and wanting to go to school. it triggered something that the terrorists pushed their l
are black, brown, asian, hispanic, middle eastern, they voted between 70 and 90% democratic and the white vote only went by 18 points to mitt romney. john of the seven largest states in the country, illinois, new york, pennsylvania, california have gone democratic in six straight elections. the other two, ohio and florida have swung democratic in two elections. and in texas, the white folks in chief connection texas -- texas are now a minority. >>> do you think this was a split verdict? >> not at all. the president won 51.4% of the popular vote which he becomes the sixth president in history to win two terms with over 50% of the dwight eisenhower, i might add. he won an electoral college landslide. george w. bush with a much smaller electoral win pronounced he had a mandate. this president is not going to use that language, it is oh, so 20th century, not how he intends to govern. but beneath the numbers of a reelected president, a senate that is divided, there was an earthquake. it was an election that, republicans should have won in a bad economy, with all that money, and they lost virtu
they can to get out. roads and recreation grounds are submerged in brown, soupy water. and in some warts of this region the only way to get around is by boat. elsewhere, it is just not safe at all. the area affected is just north of rome. here it has been raining for days. the bad weather has swept across italy. in venice, seasonal flooding was higher and more widespread than normal. and unless you were in a gondola, there was little way to stay dry. there the floods are receding. but it is now the waterlogged regions of tuscana and brea that are baring the brunt. "bbc news." >> right now china's ruling communicatist party is meeting in beijing to anoint its new leaders. among the most pressing issues they will face, a territorial dispute with japan that has erupted into the worst crisis interest the two nations in decades. at issue is a group of islands. our correspondent has gone to take a closer look and to see what is fueling all this controversy. >> just after dawn we get our first view of the islands. a jagged huddle of rocks sticking up from the deep blue waters of the east china
neil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today
awakened from their slumber to find that there are black and brown people in america and the jews and asians, and somehow they have all been given the vote. how did this happen? [laughter] they have been bribed. they have been giving gifts to these strange people. >> they are all special interest groups. they are not part of the whole. nine people getting some relief - -- young people getting some relief -- >> but you have responsible republicans saying we need to reach more to hispanics -- >> marco rubio said yesterday, "i don't know these people who don't want to work." these republican governors, if you are in a gerrymandered house is to, you could do the 47%. if you are part with any presidential aspirations, you cannot keep saying it's about people. >> it will take more than cosmetics and photo ops. it is policy. that is what they have to come to grips with, the policy. their policies don't wash with people. the people they need to reach. >> the first thing they need to do is immigration reform. >> we will see what happens in 2014 but i would not write them off entirely. >> i
of brown rice, you are eating these enormous amount of calories, is still fat. in my heart,log .'d be dead n tavis: how much of wanting to be in a project like this, i don't care if your name is sally field, hwhoever else, is there a gravitational pull to even want to be in a project like this when you know, even before it is done, you do not know if it is going to work, but if you know if it does work, it is going to be huge. when steven spielberg is taking on lincoln and daniel day-lewis is going to be lincoln. there are all kinds of signs around a project like this, this is going to beat massive. it is not about winning the academy award. if you are an actor, this is the kind of stuff that you want in your career to be a part of. is there any truth to that? >> there is a truth to it but it is not quite the same as you said. it is to me to have the opportunity and the privilege to do that kind of work with that kind of excellence around you, that it be the screenplay, standing across from the brilliant daniel day-lewis, or tommy lee jones or the cast was not to be believed. or that you w
you. >> be more. pbs. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed
you are coming up with. >> rose: let me finish it the brown versus board of education. >> exactly. >> rose: would have looked at the court in 1954 to affirm in ferguson ruling of investigate but equal instead of its decision in brown versus board of education. >> two answers. number one, the firstÑi justice harlin the dissented in mess city versus ferguson and i think i would have been with his in the dissent because as a textual ist and i have a provision saying a state cannot deny equal protection of the laws, and here you have, mississippi law or louisiana law, which required all blacks to ride in a separate car? i think i would have agreed with him. what is the less important answer. the more important answer is? >> so what? so. >> rose: so what? >> so what? i will stipulate, i will stipulate that you can do some things with an evolving constitution that you can't do with fidelity to the original constitution that the people ratified. okay? i am also stipulate that kings can do stuff that, good stuff that a democratic society could never achieve. that hitler produced a m
and a half week high. we saw more modest reactions with shares of liquor company brown-forman. its stock was up 1.9%. its special dividend totals $4 per share. avionics company heico will okayed a one-time $1.14 per share dividend. heico stock was up 1.2%. four of the five most actively traded exchange traded products were lower. the s&p 500 volatility note gained 2.1%. it usually moves in the opposite direction of the broader market. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: first, there was black friday, then cyber monday, and today it is "giving tuesday." one of every four dollars that will be given to charities this year will be donated during the holiday season. ruben ramirez reports on a new resource helping donors connect with charities making a difference in the communities they serve. >> i was feeding homeless people in grand central terminal every day. i did that for two years, 700 nights in a row. through that process, i got to know an awful lot of homeless folks, and i kept on hearing over and over again that, while they appreciated the sandwich, what they really wanted
again? they had bill clinton to lead that. ron brown as the chairman of the party. >> rose: in '88? >> from '88 to '92. it's not clear who that would be for the republicans. people talk about jeb bush, i'm not sure he's ready to take that on. there's no other obvious candidate to me right now the big issue now before we get to the elections starting in earnest-- though i agree it starts to some extent on wednesday-- is the fight over the fiscal cliff which will really divide republicans in congress and people like mike huckabee and rick santorum and others who are thinking about running for president next time. people are going to have to choose up sides and if president obama is leading those negotiations it's going to be an obama deal so for a lot of republicans in congress and around the country they're against it no matter what. they don't care what percentage of the vote he got, how big his mandate is, they'll be against it because it will have revenue in it, new revenue, and they'll be against it. >> rose: because it is -- that vote is influenced by how they perceive the batt
brown: new details emerge about the affair that led to the resignation of c.i.a. director david petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agency. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of >> this is n.b.r.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)

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